December 10, 2018

Freerunner

Ranger Archetype
Comments from the Finger: This one was written by our fantastic community manager, the Tweeter of Vecna! Not only is he fantastic at running our twitter and getting streamers to play our content, he's also a capable homebrewer himself. 

Freerunner

Agile, evasive, and unmoored from the constraints that slow down other rangers, the archetypal freerunner is supremely nimble and capable of crossing terrain as quickly as possible. They accomplish this through a skilled combination of dashing, leaping, and nimbly climbing, that guides them down clever paths through their environments. Moreover, an adept freerunner can convert the momentum from their gymnastics into deadly force, crushing their enemies with exceptional impact from unexpected directions.
     A freerunner is most at home in a city or in the treetops of a great forest, for their unique movement requires a place that is steeped with complex geometry which reaches high into the sky. Of course, even on flat terrain, a freerunner's agility is not to be underestimated, for they can dive through a giants legs or scurry up its back with ease.

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December 6, 2018

Occult Lodges | Rebinding

In this series, I'll be slowly tackling a rework of one of our favorite classes, the Binder. The class was originally a straight update of the class of the same name from D&D 3.5's Tome of Magic, including most of the original vestiges, but as we revisit this class, we'd like to examine its mechanics and its concepts with fresh eyes, improve upon them, and write a whole new list of vestiges. 

In this article, we'll be looking closely at subclasses: how we've approached them in the past and how we can improve.

Subclasses of Old

In D&D 3.5, classes didn't have associated subclasses; instead, there were a litany of prestige classes (classes you could enter with any base class, provided that you met the proper prerequisites). Though this was certainly less restricted, in practice, there were prestige classes that required features from one particular class, tying the two together in much the same way that a class and a subclass are. The 3.5 binder had a few of these prestige classes in the old Tome of Magic, which meant there were a few distinct flavors of binder.

December 4, 2018

Dyogena and Lexicon | Rebinding

In this series, I'll be slowly tackling a rework of one of our favorite classes, the Binder. The class was originally a straight update of the class of the same name from D&D 3.5's Tome of Magic, including most of the original vestiges, but as we revisit this class, we'd like to examine its mechanics and its concepts with fresh eyes, improve upon them, and write a whole new list of vestiges.

An early binder post this week with more 1st level vestiges, because we're starting to get a backlog. Enjoy!

Witch Spell List Expansion

Rules
Comments from the Knuckle: "When we wrote the Witch there was a number of spells we couldn't include because they weren't included within the SRD. Many people have asked on our Discord server that we release a list of spells that aren't contained within the SRD because we've said a couple times that the Witch should totally get the witch bolt spell. So here's an expansion to the Witch spell list; these spells come from the Player's Handbook and Xanathar's Guide to Everything, and are thematically appropriate for the Witch."

Witch Spells

November 29, 2018

Class Table Debates | Rebinding

In this series, I'll be slowly tackling a rework of one of our favorite classes, the Binder. The class was originally a straight update of the class of the same name from D&D 3.5's Tome of Magic, including most of the original vestiges, but as we revisit this class, we'd like to examine its mechanics and its concepts with fresh eyes, improve upon them, and write a whole new list of vestiges. 

It's time we talk about the all-important class table -- the beating heart of any class.

20 Levels

Getting the class table right is perhaps the single most challenging task of assembling any class. There are 20 levels to fill,  each of which must get basically one feature per level, with the most important class features landing before 5th level and with the archetypes starting before 4th. Moreover, the first and second levels can't contain an unwieldly number of features or have anything too powerful, since that incentivizes people dipping into the class for one level. This process also determines the distribution of subclass features and ability score improvements. There's a lot to get right.