November 8, 2017

Siegeball - Actions and Arena Rules

Rules
Comments from the Finger: I hear you: you want more Siegeball. You want an entire book of teams, arenas, and tournaments. Well, you'll have to wait a little longer: it doesn't seem like it's going to win a Patreon poll right now, so we'll piece together the rules over Wednesday posts until we have enough written to make it happen easily.
     If you want to vote on which book we make next, including to make a book about Siegeball and all its awesomeness, support us on Patreon!


These rules expand on our 5e Siegeball Rules

Other Siegeball Actions

In addition to attacking, dodging, shoving, and dashing, (and occasionally using an item forbidden by the referees), there are a few special actions that players of a siegeball game might take.
     Attack a Player (Illegally). In the most disreputable games, direct assaults on other players is not only allowed, it's encouraged. In most games, however, an attack can only be made when the referee isn't looking. When you make an attack on a creature in an arena that doesn't allow direct attacks, make a Dexterity (Stealth) check or a Charisma (Deception) check, contested by the referee's passive Perception score. On a success, you attack the player without consequence. On a failure, you are removed from the game for the following round, and reenter the game on a side of the arena near your tower.
     Shove actions do not incur a penalty.
     Block. You dig in your heels and hold your ground. You have advantage on any ability check or saving throw you make to resist being moved against your will, and you can use your reaction to attack any ball that moves within 5 feet of you. Additionally, if the ball is within 5 feet of you, other creatures have disadvantage on attack rolls against it.
     Cast a Spell (Illegally). In very high society (especially elven society) certain types of more civilized magic might be allowed in siegeball games, but the vast majority of games, any arcana is paramount to cheating. When you cast a spell in an arena that doesn't allow magic, you can make a Dexterity (Stealth) check or a Charisma (Deception) check, contested by the referee's passive Perception score. This roll has advantage if the target is within 5 feet of you, the effect of the spell doesn't include any large audio or visual cues (like certain illusion spells, or spells like gust of wind), or the spell is cast with the sorcerer's Subtle Spell Metamagic. It has disadvantage if the target of the spell is more than 5 feet away from you, or if the effect of the spell has obvious audio or visual effects. On a success, you cast the spell without consequence. On a failure, you are removed from the game for the following round, and reenter the game on a side of the arena near your tower.
     Inborn magical abilities like a dragonborn's Breath Weapon may or may not count as magic, at the referee's discretion.
     Follow. When you take this action, choose a creature you can see within 10 feet of you. When that creature moves, you attempt to follow behind it, moving up to your base speed, while remaining the same distance between yourself and the lead creature for the entire duration of the movement.
     Retire. When you take this action, you remove yourself from the field and sit out the rest of the game. This may be useful to free yourself from danger, but you can no longer help your team.

Arena Rules

Different siegeball arenas impose different restrictions on the games they hold, ranging from so-called underground arenas, where blood is more important than sport, to the mainstream arenas, which are funded by kings or other nobility, and thus impose fairly civilized rules.
     The following are some of restrictions that an arena might impose on the game:
     Everything Goes. Magic, deadly weapons, direct attacks on players, and even murder is all allowed in this game. Arenas that play with these rules are typically deemed Blood Arenas by spectators, and their players (which are paid handsomely for surviving) are more like gladiators than professional athletes. Expect these arenas in drow cities, and other evil locales.
     Everything Goes (Limited). Magic and direct attacks on other players are allowed, but only conventional siegeball weapons are allowed, and outright murder disqualifies a team. These rules are typically held in run-down arenas in less prosperous cities (where new siegeball teams might just get their start.)
     All Weapons. Weapons of any variety can be used in this game, up to and including massive warhammers and greatswords, but no magic of any sort is allowed. Towers have twice the HP in this game. Attacks against other players and illegal magic are penalized by removing the offending players from the field. The entire team is disqualified if its players are removed from the field three times for breaking the rules, or if one of its players outright kills a member of the other team.
     This variant of the rules is similar to the conventional rules, but allows for spectacular and dangerous weapons (and, of course, more deadly "accidents"). Particularly ravenous crowds flock to these games for the fleeting chance of watching blood being spilled.
     Limited Magic. Some spells, specifically those which do not directly deal damage to members of the other team, are allowed and allowed. At least one player on each team is encouraged to know the spells dispel magic and counterspell. Attacks against other players and illegal magic are penalized by removing the offending players from the field. The entire team is disqualified if its players are removed from the field three times for breaking the rules, or if one of its players outright kills a member of the other team. Teleporting another player mid-game across the continent, however, is allowed.
     These rules are more common where magic is viewed more favorably as a civilized art, rather than as the trickery of elves and witches. Though the spectators might seem more refined at first glance, they are just as ravenous for the blood and conflict of a good siegeball game.
     Conventional. Only conventional siegeball weapons are allowed in this game, and all magic is disallowed. Attacks against other players and illegal magic are penalized by removing the offending players from the field. The entire team is disqualified if its players are removed from the field three times for breaking the rules, or if one of its players outright kills a member of the other team.
     This is the dominant system of rules for the game, practiced in the most prominent siegeball arenas.

6 comments:

  1. YEEEEEEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    MORE SIEGEBALL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    But seriously though, I ran siegeball tournaments 3 times (one of which was at a convention) and it is always super-fun. More optional rules and example teams would be wonderful (I will also be happy to show off the teams I created for tournaments).

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    1. Awesome!

      I'll send you an email if/when we we write the Siegeball Sourcebook to get some of your ideas (though the Nails has some great ideas for example teams already, so we're well on our way to having a tournament roster). In the meantime, expect to see some small changes in the Siegeball document to make the game a little simpler to play (for example, I'm making it so that a ball always deals damage equal to its momentum points, to make things easier to calculate on the fly.)

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    2. What can one do to get in on some siegeball tournament action?

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  2. I can't wait until I can use this in my campaign world. I'm looking forward to the complete book whenever that gets to happen for sure.

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  3. You gotta add more bloodbowl style cheating items, chainsaws, doom wheels, and some generic players or feats.

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    Replies
    1. I plan to eventually! I'm excited to expand on this and piece it together, little by little.

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