May 4, 2018

Star Player

Martial Archetype
Comments from the Finger: I believe we're about finished with Siegeball material at this point; it's just a matter of wrapping up the book itself, which will happen in a few months when all the art is finished. Until then, here's the last archetype I plan to include in the book:

Star Player

Prerequisite: Proficiency in Athletics
Some siegeball players are born to make it into the history books. Thanks to tireless practice and exercise, they can outrun, outlast, and outplay their competition consistently. Normally, a team only needs one archetypical star player to have a historic season, since such a player can carry even a mediocre to the highest rungs of a tournament. Though these incredible athletes might find success in other areas, from dungeoneering to military service, they are most at home in a siegeball arena, knocking down towers and players alike.

Undefeatable Athlete
By 3rd level, your sporting prowess is legendary. You can add double your proficiency bonus to Strength (Athletics) checks you make.
     Additionally, you have advantage on saving throws you make against becoming exhausted.

Legendary Feat
At 3rd level, when you make a Strength check, saving throw, or an attack roll with a melee weapon that you make using Strength, you can reroll the die and must use the new roll. Once you use this ability, you can't use it again until you finish a long rest. Starting at 15th level, you can use this ability again when you finish a short or long rest.

World Renown
By 7th level, your athletic reputation precedes you wherever you travel. You have advantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks you make against creatures that have heard of your sporting history.

Well of Fortune
Starting at 10th level, you have 1 luck point, which you can spend to gain advantage on an ability check, attack roll, or saving throw. You can only have one luck point at a time and regain your luck point when you finish a long rest.
     You can also regain your luck point by saving up your luck from fortunate events. When you score a critical hit on an attack roll against a hostile creature, you can choose to make it a normal hit and gain a luck point instead. The attack still hits, but does not deal critical damage.
     Starting at 18th level, when you spend a luck point on a roll, you can treat the d20 roll as a 20.

Extraordinary Athletics
Starting at 15th level, you can consistently outperform your opponents. Whenever you make a Strength check, you can treat a d20 roll of 9 or lower as a 10. Additionally, melee weapon attacks that you make using Strength do not automatically miss when you roll a 1.

11 comments:

  1. Wait, forgive me if i'm wrong, but isnt the 18th level well of fortune just the rogues Stroke of Luck ability that they get at 20th level? Not only that, but if you roll a 20, you get that assured 20 back? I think this needs to be nerfed

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    1. Not to mention, is the "Lucky" feat under the same effects? 4 20's in one long rest, i know this probably isnt the intended usage, but you should change the name to "fortune points" or the like, just to avoid confusion and basically a 18th level fighter having legendary resistance or the like

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    2. In the original design, these Luck points functioned identically to the Luck points from the feat, and the intent was that they could stack, but later designs changed their operation a bit, so I /should/ probably change the name.

      Now, this feature is _similar_ to the rogue's Stroke of Luck ability, but these are substantially different features: you get one roll for free each day, rogues get one per short rest. If you want to save up Luck, you have to forgo a critical hit, which doesn't happen with enough regularity to be consistent (we've playtested this mechanic a few times, so I can speak from experience on that last point.)

      It is powerful? Sure. Is it too powerful? Not at all. Compare this feature against other 18th level fighter features, like the champion's HP regen, and you'll see that it's actually pretty mild. As a rule, it's more valuable to compare features against those in its same class, rather than comparing across classes.

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  2. Kind of disappointed there are no FFX references here... :/

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    1. There's a reason for that: I know /nothing/ about FFX.

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    2. But I'm the *star player* of the Zanarkand Abes!

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    3. I can't recommend FFX enough. Go play it, Finger.

      Dew it.

      Don't make me spam the Home alarm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzEkFLVOX5g

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  3. Dude, May 4th. Why on earth didn't you make a Star Wars thing?

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  4. So... Well of Fortune can treat a d20 roll as nat 20, which is a crit if the roll is an attack. By my understanding one could spent the point to have a 20 on attack roll, forego the extra damage from crit to gain the point again, which basically gives perfect aim forever as long as you give up the extra crit damage.
    Where did I miss something?

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    1. The idea here is that you can't use a luck point to gain a luck point; you can only recycle natural 20s to gain a luck point. Not sure how to reword this to make that perfectly clear.

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    2. Yeah, I imagined that was the idea, it's just that the wording implies a possible trade (and after years of DMing I'm this close, and imagine that you all as well, to comit murder by rulebook throw on the next player who comes with RAW instead of RAI).
      You can't use a point to get a point, but you can use a point to get a crit(on level 18), and a crit gets you a point (if you forego the extra dmg).
      One way to fix the wording would be explicit about the "treat the dice roll as 20" not counting as a natural 20, thus not generating a crit to begin with.

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