October 10, 2019

Jinx

Sorcerous Origin
Notes from the Nails: been a while since I've written a sorcerer. This one is inspired by my own personal life!

Jinx

Some people are cursed with bad luck from the day they were born. Known as 'jinxes', they are shunned everywhere they go, for fear that their misfortune will affect anyone who gets too close. As it goes, this fear is actually well-founded, for a jinx really can inflict their curse on other people and, with training, they can even harness it into a potent source of magical energy.

Cause Fumble
Starting at 1st level, whenever a creature within 30 feet of you rolls a 1 the d20 for an attack roll, ability check or saving throw, you can use your reaction to amplify their bad luck. You can choose one of the following outcomes to inflict upon the attacker: they fall prone, they drop everything that they are holding, or they take 1d10 piercing damage.

Aura of Misfortune
Also at 1st level, you radiate an aura of misfortune. Each hostile creature within 15 feet of you (except yourself) suffers a -1 penalty to all attack and damage rolls.
     When you reach 14th level, the penalty increases to -2.

Ruin Foretold
By 6th level, your predictions of ill luck always come true, mostly because you are able to use your magic to make them happen. When you cast a spell that targets a single hostile creature, you can spend 3 sorcery points to delay the onset of the spell by up to 1 minute. You must concentrate on the spell while it is being delayed. The spell takes effect as soon as your concentration ends, or 1 minute after you initially cast it if you maintain their concentration for the whole minute.

Bad Omen
At 14th level, your presence always makes bad things worse for your enemies. All hostile creatures that are being affected by a spell that you are concentrating on have disadvantage on attack rolls against you.

Walking Disaster
When you reach 18th level, your curse reaches its maximum power, spreading chaos and misery all around you. You exude an aura of disaster in a 60-foot radius around you, which you can enable or disable as a bonus action on your turn. While the aura is enabled, no creature within it can gain advantage on any roll (or use advantage to cancel out disadvantage), critical hits cannot happen (and may even result in a miss if the total attack roll is less than the target's AC), and abilities like the Lucky feat and the Halfling Luck racial feature cannot be used.

9 comments:

  1. This is definitely one of the coolest sorcerer ideas I've ever seen. Really awesome.

    I think cause fumble should specify it's magical damage.

    Aura of misfortune doesn't need to disclude you; you're not hostile to yourself.

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    1. The implication that you could be hostile to yourself was deliberate. It's a millennial joke. :P

      And I dunno about magical damage. I don't feel like it really needs to be... What does everyone else think?

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    2. Well, that depends on what causes the damage exactly... If the creature just impales itself or steps on a spike then no. Maybe the damage is considered magical if the creature itself has magic weapons?

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    3. Part of me wants to make it Bludgeoning/Piercing/Slashing based on DM discretion, part of me wants it to be Force damage because of the forces plotting against you, because few things address force damage, and because it feels appropriate for a random reason to trip and drop things for literally no reason.

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    4. It's fine as just "piercing". Since it's not coming from a weapon attack, it counts as the same as if it were from a magical piercing weapon.

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  2. hi just wanted to say the art is fabulous as is the concept

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  3. aura of misfortune is the closest thing to "aura of despair" I have ever seen.
    Actual blackguards, here I come

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  4. Ok, Ruin Fortold... So lets say I cast Disintigrate, walk up act normal and then activate it. Do you still have to point and finish the spell or does it just go off (a la subtle spell)?

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    1. You'd perform the spell components when you cast the spell - before the delay starts. So it's not totally subtle, but you could make it seem that way if the target wasn't paying attention to you a minute ago.

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